Alex Txikon on the summit of Ama Dablam

Alex Txikon

Everest may come. The Spaniard Alex Txikon reached today at 10.15 a.m. local time with his compatriot Jonatan Garcia and the Nepalese Pasang Sherpa, Cheppal Sherpa and Kalden Sherpa the 6,814-meter-high summit of the shapely Ama Dablam (see the video below). “It’s been a tough ascent,” the 38-year-old reported from the highest point. “Wind hit us hard all the way up, but here we are, the five of us on top! Next, let’s start descending carefully.” In the meantime, the five climbers have returned to base camp safely.

Txikon’s winter ascent on Ama Dablam – the first ascent of this mountain in winter, by the way, was achieved by the South Korean Sun-Woo Nam on 5 December 1983 – was in a way the dress rehearsal for Alex’s actual project: After his unsuccessful attempts in winter 2017 and 2018, he now wants to try for the third time to climb Mount Everest in winter without breathing mask. Txikon plans to ascend via the normal route on the Nepalese south side of the highest mountain on earth.

Kobusch in Everest Base Camp

German mountaineer Jost Kobusch has chosen a different route. The 27-year-old wants to reach the summit at 8,850 meters via the West Ridge and the Hornbein Couloir in the Everest North Face. Jost is climbing solo and without bottled oxygen. After an ascent to the approximately 6,000-meter-high Lho La, where he explored the entrance to the West Ridge, he is currently back in base camp.

Mingma Gyalje Sherpa and Co. at the foot of K2

K2

In Pakistan, the Nepalese expedition leader Mingma Gyalje Sherpa and his team have reached K2 Base Camp four days ago. The 8,611-meter-high K2, the second highest mountain on earth, is the only one of the 14 eight-thousanders that has so far never been scaled in winter. At the nearby eight-thousander Broad Peak, Denis Urubko, Don Bowie and Lotta Hintsa have worked their way up to an altitude of around 6,800 meters. The way to the summit is not yet clear, Denis let us know yesterday, adding that one more day of work at 7,000 meters was still necessary.

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